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5 Eco-Friendly Insulation Products

Posted by on Aug 1, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 5 Eco-Friendly Insulation Products

If it’s time to redo the insulation that helps keep your home cool in summer and warm in winter, you may be wondering if there are green options among insulation materials. Fortunately, a variety of eco-friendly insulation exists. Following are five types of green insulation for your consideration — you’re sure to find one that works for your specific situation.  Hempcrete Hemp is a crop that grows quickly and requires very little maintenance during cultivation. It’s a versatile plant that can be grown in both temperate and tropical climate and absorbs significant amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Hempcrete has high insulating properties and is made from the cellulose cores of commercially grown hemp plants.  Recycled Denim Also known as cotton fiber insulation, recycled denim insulation is made from the scraps left over from the process of manufacturing denim clothing. This insulation is made from materials that would have otherwise ended up in landfills, and it can be further recycled once the insulation reaches its usable lifespan. Denim insulation is also about 30-percent acoustically superior than insulation materials like fiberglass, resulting in a more serene indoor environment. Using recycled denim insulation also results in higher indoor air quality because it contains no formaldehyde or other volatile organic compounds that have the potential to pollute the indoor environment. Recycled denim insulation is treated with a safe borate solution for superior fire-resistance, earning it a Class A rating from the EPA, which means that it is not readily flammable and will not contribute to the growth and spread of existing fires. It’s also treated with an EPA-approved fungicide to protect against the development of mold and mildew colonies.  Sheep Wool Insulation  You’re probably already familiar with the superior insulating properties of sheep’s wool — after all, most people reach for a wool sweater when outdoor temperatures become chilly. Sheep wool makes superior household insulation for the same reasons you can count on it to keep you warm on a blustery winter day. It’s a breathable, fire-resistant material that contains tiny pockets that trap air, keeping homes warmer in winter and cooler during summer. Homeowners with sheep wool insulation find themselves adjusting their heating and cooling control systems less often than with other types of insulation. Sheep wool insulation also absorbs moisture from the atmosphere, preventing conditions from becoming overly humid.  Cellulose Insulation  Newspapers and other waste paper gleaned from community recycling programs are used to create cellulose insulation. You may be thinking that paper-based insulation products are probably extremely flammable, but that’s not the case with cellulose insulation — it has a Class A fire-resistance rating. This type of insulation can actually help control the spread of fire. Cellulose insulation also doesn’t contain formaldehyde or other potentially harmful compounds that can pollute the indoor atmosphere and pose health risks to humans and domestic pets.  Expanded Cork Insulation  This all-natural insulation product might already be familiar to you if you are a wine connoisseur — it’s the same material that’s used to produce wine corks. Expanded cork insulation is made from cork granules that are treated by exposure to ultra-heated steam that activates a natural binding agent present in the wood, resulting in an end product with superior density. Expanded cork insulation also has enhanced acoustic properties, making it an excellent choice for those who live in noisy...

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5 Common Myths About Home Fire Sprinklers Debunked

Posted by on Jun 27, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 5 Common Myths About Home Fire Sprinklers Debunked

Automatic sprinkler systems have been a standard safety requirement for many commercial buildings for decades, but expanding the equipment to the residential market has been a very slow process. Most homeowners aren’t aware of the facts about these life-saving sprinklers and instead make their decisions based on widespread myths. Learn to separate the truth from the myths when it comes to home fire sprinkler systems. Home Sprinklers are Expensive It’s true, installing sprinklers in your home will cost more than simply not adding any fire safety equipment at all. However, it’s less expensive than you probably think to add the plumbing and sprinklers during the construction process. For a new home, you could spend as little as $1.35 per square foot for continuous and automatic coverage. For a 1,000 square foot home, that’s just $1,350. When you consider the costs of repairing after even a small kitchen fire, that’s a drop in the bucket. Fire damage restoration costs $45,000 on average and that’s only if the home can be saved, so even spending a few thousand on installation in an existing home will save you money in case of a fire. Home Sprinklers are Banned Some homeowners believe that their local or state building codes have banned the installation of automatic fire sprinkler systems in residential buildings. However, this is very unlikely to be true. In fact, it’s a growing trend for building code officials to require new home construction to include these safety features. In fact, there have even been proposed revisions to the International Building Code that would mandate this equipment for all new construction. Double check your local codes by calling the code enforcement office for your city or county before assuming you’re not allowed to install such an important life-saving system in your own home. Home Sprinklers Don’t Work A poorly maintained or incorrectly installed sprinkler system can definitely fail to put out a fire, but that’s a fact that extends to everything in life. A fire sprinkler system that functions as it was intended to does work to put out a fire and will save lives and prevent damage to the home. Sprinklers that go off at the wrong time are very rare, and modern systems are built to only trigger the sprinklers in the room where the fire has started. This minimizes water damage, which is still easier and less expensive to clean up than fire and smoke damage. It’s not smoke that triggers the water to come on but heat instead, so you won’t have to worry about soaking your carpet just because your toast got a little too dark. Installing a sprinkler system reduces your chances of dying if there is a fire by 82%, so obviously they do work to control fires and save lives. The 97% reduction in property damage is nothing to sneeze at either. Home Sprinklers Waste Water It might seem silly to worry about how much water is being using to douse a flaming oven or curtain, but some homeowners do use it as an excuse not to invest in fire sprinklers. Yet this is an easy myth to debunk simply by checking the gallons of water used by firefighters when they’re putting out a blaze. In a 15-year study, sprinklers were able to put out...

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3 Kitchen Design Tips That Can Help Seniors Age In Place

Posted by on May 16, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 3 Kitchen Design Tips That Can Help Seniors Age In Place

Aging in place is a growing trend among seniors. Many seniors don’t want to move to assisted living or nursing homes and are trying to find ways to stay in their homes during their golden years. This is called aging in place. Often, home modifications are needed in order to enable seniors to safely care for themselves alone as they age. The kitchen can be a particularly problematic space for seniors with disabilities or mobility issues, but with some remodeling, you can help a senior in your life turn their kitchen into a safer space that’s easy to navigate. Take a look at the kitchen design tips that are perfect for seniors. Start With ADA Standards Luckily, there’s an easy place to start when it comes to designing a safe kitchen, and the chances are good that any reputable contractor you hire will already be familiar with it. The place to start is with the standards laid out in the Americans With Disabilities ACT, or the ADA. You can use the ADA standards to help you design a kitchen that’s accessible and convenient for seniors with mobility issues. For example, the ADA says that in pass-through kitchens, the clearance between the counters, appliances, or cabinets on both sides should be 40 inches. In U-shaped kitchens, 60 inches of clearance is required. Following these space guidelines will ensure that your loved one will have enough space to navigate the kitchen even if they’re using a walker or confined to a wheelchair. Choose Cabinets With Drawers Cabinets with drawers offer a big advantage over cabinets with doors. When your cabinets have doors, you have to reach in and rummage through the shelves to find what you need or to put something back in its proper place. This can get difficult, especially with low cabinets that would require you to get on your hands and knees to reach inside of. Drawers are much more accessible for people with mobility issues. Once you pull out the drawer, everything is within easy grabbing reach, even the things that were stored all the way in the back. It’s also easier to put everything away in its proper place. It’s a common misconception that drawers don’t provide enough storage space, but the truth is that large drawers can be used to store pots and pans as easily as small drawers can store flatware. A pantry with pullout shelves is similarly helpful when creating an accessible kitchen. Position the Sink Close to the Stove When you’re cooking, you will often find yourself carrying pots of water from the sink to the stove, or carrying pans full of food to the sink in order to drain liquid from them. This is a simple thing when you’re able-bodied, but for older people, carrying full pots and pans can be hard on the arms and back. The closer the stove is to the sink, the easier it will be for a senior to continue to cook when they want to. That doesn’t mean that the sink and stove should necessarily be right next to each other. You also need a workspace within easy reach so that the person cooking can set the pot down quickly if need be. The best option is to put the sink and the stove on...

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Drying Out Your Water Damaged Home Fast: Why It Is Important And How To Do It

Posted by on Apr 12, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Drying Out Your Water Damaged Home Fast: Why It Is Important And How To Do It

When a home falls prey to water damage, it can leave homeowners such as yourself feeling devastated. Water damage can destroy many aspects of the home from the furnishings within to the structural integrity of the house. Fortunately for you, knowing why it’s important to dry out your home fast and understanding how to do it properly can help minimize any damages. The Importance of Fast Drying Drying out a water damaged home is of the utmost importance, and the quicker you dry out your home, the better. For instance, drywall wicks up one inch of water every hour during the first 24 hours, which means you want to get the water out quickly in order to avoid permanent damage. Luckily, gypsum drywall often becomes stronger after water extraction as long as it is performed quickly enough. Another reason to remove water from your home as quickly as possible is to protect the integrity of your insulation. Wet, compacted insulation loses its ability to work properly. If insulation is not dried within 2-3 days, you will need to remove and replace it. A professional can use a moisture meter to determine how much moisture remains inside the wall so you know whether or not you need to replace your insulation. Proper Drying Methods Drying out your home is not as simple as opening windows and doors and hoping that the moisture will quickly evaporate. In order to quickly and effectively remove water from your home, you will need to extract it quickly. Your best method of extraction is to hire a professional. Of course, there are a few things you can do while you wait for a professional to arrive. A shop vac can work wonders on a water damaged home since they have the capability of sucking up moisture. Make sure your home does not pose the threat of electrocution before using the shop vac. Once you have verified that there is no threat, proceed to use your shop vac to extract water from carpeted areas in your home. Keep in mind that you will likely have to go over the area several times in order to remove the water. The key is to use the shop vac until you are no longer able to get any water out of the carpet. If you have area rugs, remove them from the home and place them outside in the sun. The sun’s UV rays can work to kill off any potential mold-causing bacteria in order to protect your home. Place dehumidifiers around your home in order to remove moisture from the air. Dehumidifiers provide a safe and effective way to minimize moisture. Place large fans in the windows and doorways to help speed up the drying process. Although it is sometimes recommended that you used forced air to dry out your home, keep in mind that heat and forced air may damage features in historic buildings. For the time being, it is better to rely on air circulation and simple extraction methods. Let a professional decide if forced air and heating applications will work best for your home. The last thing you want to do is cause further damage to your home because of improper drying methods. Professionals can assist you in providing the right drying method for your home whether it...

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An Ounce Of Prevention For Your Septic System

Posted by on Mar 24, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on An Ounce Of Prevention For Your Septic System

Having your septic system back up or overflow is one of the most irritating things that can happen when you’re a homeowner. Not only do you have to deal with the stench, but you can’t use your plumbing until the plumber arrives to fix the problem and pump your tank. Luckily, there are a few things you can do to help reduce your risk of septic system issues. Minimize your garbage disposal use. Garbage disposals are surely convenient, but each time you use yours to grind up food and send it down the drain, you’re adding to the solid waste in the bottom of your septic tank. This waste takes a while to break down and be washed out of the septic tank. If you use your garbage disposal too often and let waste build up too quickly, there won’t be room left in the tank for liquid, and you’ll have an overflow. Try to use your garbage disposal only when you’re really in a hurry and can’t take the time to scrape plates off into the trash instead. And avoid putting fibrous foods like orange peels and celery down the disposal. They don’t grind up well, so they take even longer to break down in your septic tank. Avoid using harsh drain cleaners. (Use vinegar and baking soda instead). Chemical drain cleaners are not particularly good for anyone, since they present hazards to health and can corrode pipes. They’re even worse if you have a septic tank, since they can kill the bacteria responsible for breaking down waste in your tank. If the bacteria levels fall too low, waste will just keep building up in the tank until it overflows rather than being slowly broken down. Stay away from chemical drain cleaners, and use a mixture of baking soda and vinegar instead when your drains need cleaning. The foaming action will loosen most clogs — you just have to give it an hour or two to work before rinsing it away. Don’t flush feminine hygiene products down the toilet. The tampon package might say “flushable,” but when you have a septic tank, you really only want to flush toilet paper and human waste. Feminine hygiene products take way too long to break down. They just add volume to the tank and increase your risk of an overflow. Have your tank pumped on a regular schedule, whether or not it “seems like it needs it.” Many homeowners are under the false impression that if their tank does not seem to be having any issues, they don’t need to have it pumped. Unfortunately, if you wait until your tank “tells you” it needs to be pumped, you’ll have sewage all over your yard. It’s better to be proactive and pump your tank before there are any issues. Determining when your tank needs to be pumped can be a bit of a guessing game, but a good guideline is to have it pumped every four years. While your plumber is on site, you can ask if he or she thinks your tank could go longer between pumping sessions next time. Don’t park over your septic tank or place anything heavy on top of it. Parking a car on top of a tank or setting anything else really heavy on top of...

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Forklift Operators: Keep Your Fellow Warehouse Employees Safe With These 4 Steps

Posted by on Mar 4, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Forklift Operators: Keep Your Fellow Warehouse Employees Safe With These 4 Steps

There are inherent risks you face if you’re a warehouse worker. Accidents aren’t common, but they do occur. For every 100 full-time workers employed in a warehouse, the number of work-related accidents or illnesses reported to the BLS in 2014 was 5.2. If you work in a warehouse as a forklift operator, here are four simple steps you can take to keep your coworkers and yourself from being hurt by the material handling equipment you drive. Take Your Forklift for a Test Drive Before you start picking up and transporting pallets with your forklift, take it for a quick spin to make sure everything’s working properly. You should do this before each shift, to make sure it didn’t break down while you weren’t working. A few tests you can do include the following: go forwards and backwards a little to check the gears try turning both left and right to check the steering come to a stop to check the brakes raise the arms and bring them back down them to check for smooth lifting and lowering While performing these tests, you should also make sure there aren’t any warning lights that remain on. If the forklift fails any of these tests or there are warning lights on, ask your warehouse’s material handling equipment manager to have the lift serviced. You shouldn’t use it until it’s fixed. Make Sure Your Path is Clear You should also check where you’ll be driving to make sure your pathway is clear. It should be both free of visual obstructions that would prevent you from seeing where you’re going and from physical obstacles that would block the forklift from moving forward. Clearing away any obstructions or obstacles driving will reduce the chances that you hit someone. Taking care of this before you start will ensure you don’t have to get down from the forklift while driving to move something. Show Up On Time Showing up to work on time is expected in most professions, but being on time is especially important when working in a warehouse with forklift. If you’re late, you’ll be pressed for time. After all, orders won’t wait just because you showed up tardy. Incoming orders still need to be put away, and outgoing ones must still be shipped. If you show up late, you’ll be tempted to rush to meet your warehouse’s deadlines. Rushing can lead to cutting corners and unsafe operation of the forklift. By showing up when you’re supposed to, you’ll ensure that you have time throughout your shift to do the work assigned to you without rushing. Because you’ll have enough time, you’ll be able to operate the forklift at safe speeds, always observing any speed limits posted in the warehouse slow down when taking corners accelerate and decelerate gradually when carrying large or heavy loads double-check that your loads are stable and properly secured Know Your Forklift’s Maximum Load All forklifts have a maximum load, which should never be exceeded. If it is, the forklift can tip forwards. This may cause the forklift to tip forwards just slightly so that the rear wheels come off the ground, which makes it impossible to properly drive the forklift. Exceeding the maximum load can also cause a forklift to pitch far enough forwards that it falls over. You...

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How To Host A Holiday Gathering In A Small Home

Posted by on Nov 13, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

With the holidays quickly approaching, you might be making plans to see faraway relatives or to include your friends in your festivities. If you’ve wanted to host Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah or another holiday gathering but have hesitated because you have a small home, don’t despair! There are ways that you can successfully host a holiday get-together even if your home’s square footage is in the triple digits. Read on for some tips on fitting everyone in a snug and cozy home. Plan an Afternoon Gathering Hosting a big lunch or dinner might be too much if your kitchen is the size of a postage stamp and you don’t have a separate dining room. Instead of serving a turkey dinner with all of the trimmings, however, you can always host dessert or an appetizers-and-wine gathering. Aiming for a time in the mid-to-late afternoon means that no one will be ravenously expecting a full meal. Focus on foods that people can eat while walking around or sitting in your living room, and you’ll find that people will mingle in your small space. Make Use of the Outdoors Depending on where you live, it might be freezing cold or nice and pleasant outside. If you live south of the Mason-Dixon line (or if your state is having an unseasonably warm stretch during the holidays), you may be able to open up your balcony, front porch, back deck or lanai for entertaining. This step alone could give you a couple hundred or more square feet, free for the taking! Even if it’s chilly outside, if you are serving hot apple cider, coffee or hot chocolate, people might not be averse to bundling up and sitting on front-porch rockers or on your patio set. Make them more appealing by adding chenille or fleece blankets. Add Potty Facilities One logistical problem to overcome is inviting many people over when you have only one bathroom. Particularly if you have children coming who might need to make an emergency visit to the lavatory, not having a backup bathroom could lead to discomfort and embarrassment for your guests. If it’s not terribly cold out, consider renting a portable toilet rental and setting it up in your backyard. Since it’s only going to be for your guests, it won’t become unpleasant during the time that you host your gathering. Be Creative With Seating If you’re looking around your house or apartment and wondering where everyone is going to sit, remember that you can always improvise seating. Ottomans make good seats; just position them next to other living room furniture instead of directly in front of your couches or chairs. Folding chairs also add seating in a pinch. If you can’t borrow the chairs that you need, you could also rent them from a party supply rental store. Are you lacking a sofa and loveseat in your living room? If you currently sleep on or own a twin bed, you can make an impromptu sofa out of it by bringing it into the living room. Just position it against a wall, put on clean sheets and add some throw pillows for a soft landing place for at least two or three guests. Finally, just remember that during the holidays, most people don’t mind being in tight quarters! The point is...

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Have Outdoor Pets? What Fence Should You Choose?

Posted by on Nov 13, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If you have outdoor animals, your concerns about your pets’ safety (as well as local laws) often require you to keep your pets secured — either on a leash or behind a fence. But what type of fence provides the best protection at the best price? Read on to learn more about some of the most common fencing options for homes with outdoor pets. Wooden fence The wooden fence is a classic — available in a variety of panel sizes and finishes, it can be designed to match any theme or decor. However, these fences have specific advantages and disadvantages when it comes to corralling pets. Advantages These fences provide visual privacy, which can help keep a nervous dog from barking at every stray leaf or passerby. These fences are visually appealing, and certain types (such as cedar) are pest-resistant. Disadvantages Depending upon the type of material, wooden fencing can be more expensive than other types of fencing. The average cost per 25 linear feet of fencing is around $400 to $600. If you have a dog who likes to dig or a cat who likes to climb, your fence may be easily damaged by claw or bite marks. PVC fence PVC fences have a similar appearance to wooden fences, but are made of a durable, weather-treated plastic. Advantages When PVC anchoring posts are used, these fences are more durable and less prone to rotting than traditional wooden fences. PVC fences come in a variety of colors and don’t need paint. Disadvantages Like wooden fencing, these fences can be expensive — around $600 to $700 per 25 linear feet. Because PVC fences generally come in large sections or panels — rather than individual pickets — it is more difficult and costly to repair small damaged areas than it is to repair similar damage to a wooden fence. Chain link fence A mainstay in many areas, chain link fences are a simple and inexpensive way to ensure pets stay in your yard and pests and predators stay out. Advantages These fences are among the least expensive available — around $400 to $550 per 25 linear feet. Chain link fences are very durable, and can be rust-proofed to last for decades. Disadvantages These fences are among the least aesthetically-appealing, and some homeowners associations (HOAs) may prohibit them in favor of solid wood or PVC fencing. Most chain link fences are lower than other types of fences, so that if you have a high-jumping dog, he or she may be able to escape the confines of your fence. Underground electric fence One of the only fences geared specifically toward pets, an “invisible” fence is installed underground, around the perimeter of your lawn. An electronic collar receives wireless signals from the fence, and your pet will receive a small, harmless electric shock if he or she breaches the fence. Advantages These fences are relatively inexpensive to install and maintain — between $300 and $900 for 600 linear feet (or about a quarter-acre lot). Their price per linear foot is substantially less than even the most inexpensive chain link or wooden fences. Because the wireless fence is invisible, you don’t need to worry about painting, patching holes, or any of the other typical maintenance associated with fencing. Disadvantages Although these fences are useful in...

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Four Renovations To Add More Natural Light To Your House

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Older homes were not designed to have tons of natural light, so you might have to get creative with some redesigns in order to increase the daylight in your home. With some simple (and not-so-simple) additions, you can enjoy the all the benefits that natural light provides to a living space. Repaint If you love color, and your home is full of bright red, deep green, or even dark gray feature walls, you might want to reconsider going for a lighter color palette. Whites, creams, and light grays reflect the light that comes through your windows, highlighting natural light, instead of dulling it down. If you’re addicted to color, use your furniture or artwork to provide the interest. Also, it’s a good idea to paint your ceiling pure white in order to create the illusion that your ceilings are higher, and the ceiling will reflect the light into the room to make the most of the light you already have.  Change Windows And Doors In order to let light in, you’ve got to choose the right portals for the job. If you have solid doors for your entrances, consider choosing doors with windows. Replace double doors with french doors, which will give the illusion of tall windows and let more light inside the home, while allowing more visibility to the outside.  If your windows are small, you can replace them with larger ones by cutting a larger opening. If your windows are old and you are going to replace them anyway, it does not cost much more simply to order larger sizes and make the adjustments in the wall to have them fit. Install A Skylight You can easily increase the amount of light in your home (and reduce the amount of electricity you need to light your home during the day) by installing a skylight. Large skylights provide plenty of light, but require some expertise and expense to install. Tubular skylights are smaller, but can still provide light due to a reflecting design. However, improperly installed skylights can damage your roof and house, as improperly sealed edges can let in moisture that will lead to water damage. In order to make sure your skylight is designed and installed properly, it’s best to hire a roofing contractor to perform the work. Check out sites like http://www.palmerroofing.net to find a contractor near you. Go For Open Concept One of the reasons why open floor plans are so popular is because they allow windows in each room to operate at maximum potential. If you have a window in the kitchen, and another in the living room, both windows work to light both spaces, instead of each lighting each room separately. If you have an older house where walls define every room, you might consider contacting a contractor about the possibility of simply removing a few walls on your main floor. Some walls are load-bearing, which means they preserve the structural integrity of the house. When you wish to remove a load bearing wall, a large support beam or a set of pillar should be installed in its place. This usually requires the knowledge of a contractor and a structural engineer.  Once the walls are gone, light from your windows will flow freely from room to room, making it seem much more...

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Tips For Preventing Tree Roots From Damaging Water And Sewer Pipes

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Like all living entities, trees will do whatever it takes to obtain the nourishment they need to thrive. This includes stretching their roots out to tap into a rich source of water and nutrients: your water and sewer pipes. If left unchecked, tree roots can damage your plumbing and force you to pay up to $10,000 or more to replace broken pipes. To avoid this problem, here are a few ways you can stop tree roots from hurting your plumbing. Know Before You Plant Before planting trees on your property, it’s a good idea to find out the location of your pipes so you can avoid putting the trees near them. Over time, the trees roots will eventually find their way to your pipes if you don’t take other precautions. However, that doesn’t mean you have to make it easy for them. If you don’t have house plans showing how the piping is laid out on your property, you can get that information by calling your local public works department. Tell them that you will be digging in your yard and need to know where the utility lines are. They will send someone out to your home to mark where the lines are so you can plan your landscaping accordingly. Pick Your Trees Wisely Another thing you can do is to plant slow-growing trees with small roots. If you place them far enough away from the water and sewer lines, you probably won’t have to worry about roots invading your pipes for at least a decade if not longer. Amur or Japanese maples, redwoods, white fringe trees and dogwoods are all good examples of slow-growing trees that work well in residential yards. Once you’ve planted the trees in your yard, you should invest in having the roots trimmed back on a regular basis. You can contract with a root specialist to have them physically dig into the ground and prune the roots. You can also use a variety of chemical substances such as copper sulfate crystals to kill excess roots. Be aware, though, that being too aggressive with the trimming or using certain chemicals can cause the tree to die. Create a Barrier Erecting a barrier around your water and sewer pipes can also help keep tree roots from invading your plumbing. This barrier can be anything from blocks of wood placed on the side of the pipes facing the trees or a few layers of a chemical retardant such as potassium hydroxide near the plumbing. The barrier may need to be replaced after a while, so you’ll want to add that task to your home maintenance plan. Detecting Plumbing Trouble In spite of these preventative methods, tree roots may still find their way into your plumbing lines. It can be challenging to tell whether or not this is the case without digging up your yard. Tree roots in pipes cause clogging, slow-flowing drains and overflowing. There may also be gurgling sounds when you flush the toilet. If you’re experiencing these issues on a regular basis, you may have a tree root problem. There are a couple of ways you can deal with this issue. The most common way is to use a chemical root killer. You simply pour the substance down the drain and its corrosive effects clear...

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